ISSN 2330-717X

Opposition Mounts To Moscow’s Plan For Creating 14 Economic Macro-Regions – OpEd

By

Ever more analysts and commentators in Moscow have been criticizing the Russian government’s plan to divide the country into 15 economic macro-regions as nothing more than a reprise of Nikita Khrushchev’s failed effort to do something similar 60 years ago (stoletie.ru/vzglyad/ne_nastupit_by_na_sovetskije_grabli_892.htm).

That opposition has been noted, but a potentially more powerful negative vote on the new plan by the economic development ministry is being cast in the regions, and especially in the Urals Federal District. There, the presidential plenipotentiary reports, “all the regions” within his district oppose it (kommersant.ru/doc/3733372).

Such opposition may not be sufficient to kill central efforts at putting this plan into place, of course; but it almost certainly means that if Moscow does go ahead, the regions are ready, willing and in many respects able to kill it from below after the ministry and the government declare victory.

Kommersant journalists have been able to confirm the negative attitudes of at least some regions, including that of officials in Perm Kray. And they quote Ivan Devchenko, a KPRF deputy in the Tyumen Oblast Duma as saying that the whole idea of macro-regions is “a profanation” that will “bring us nothing good.”

Meanwhile, Moscow political analyst Konstantin Kalachev tells the paper that “the very idea of macro-regions looks to be far from fully developed and offers only the imitation of activity.” Worse, it represents “a revival of Soviet practices” with their over-bureaucratization and hyper-centralization. Both will kill any chances for real economic growth.


Enjoy the article? Then please consider donating today to ensure that Eurasia Review can continue to be able to provide similar content.


Paul Goble

Paul Goble

Paul Goble is a longtime specialist on ethnic and religious questions in Eurasia. Most recently, he was director of research and publications at the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy. Earlier, he served as vice dean for the social sciences and humanities at Audentes University in Tallinn and a senior research associate at the EuroCollege of the University of Tartu in Estonia. He has served in various capacities in the U.S. State Department, the Central Intelligence Agency and the International Broadcasting Bureau as well as at the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Mr. Goble maintains the Window on Eurasia blog and can be contacted directly at [email protected] .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

CLOSE
CLOSE