ISSN 2330-717X

Umerov Case Highlights Why Crimean Anschluss A Threat To Russians – OpEd

By

All people of good will can only welcome the release of Ilmi Umerov from a psychiatric hospital, after an international campaign including quite possibly the intervention of US President Barack Obama; but this use of Soviet-style psychiatric prisons should lead Russians to revise their view of the Crimean Anschluss, Vitaly Portnikov says.

The Ukrainian commentator notes that a large majority of Russians still view Vladimir Putin’s annexation of Crimea as something positive despite sanctions, but the Kremlin leader’s actions in Crimea, including the incarceration of the Crimean Tatar leader, should cause them to rethink their position (ru.krymr.com/a/27974555.html).

That is because, Portnikov points out, Putin over the last two years has used Crimea as a laboratory to test out new or restored repressive measures like punitive psychiatry that all too easily could spread to Russian society because the Umeroc case is a bellwether of a situation in which “the insane are treating the healthy.”

Indeed, he suggests, whatever psychological benefits Russians may have derived from the seizure of Ukraine’s Crimea are far exceeded by the dangers that “the rebirth of [Soviet-style] punitive psychiatry” represents.

What the Russian occupation authorities have done to Umerov is “an act unprecedented for our times,” Portnikov says, “but it isn’t for the times of the Soviet Union when punitive psychiatry was one of the important instruments for dealing with dissent.” And what is especially worrisome is that this time around those using this instrument have been quite open about it.

In Soviet times, he continues, “the communist rulers who themselves believed in the correctness of their hypocritical ideology no more than they believed in the landings of people from other planets considered anyone who didn’t want to share their idiocy to be an idiot” and thus requiring treatment to make them “’like all’ other Soviet people.”

The situation in today’s Russia is “much worse,” Portnikov says, “because many of its leaders and many of its residents really and sincerely believe in that chauvinist nonsense which Putin uses and television repeats. And Putin himself believes it” because it is “much easier to believe in fascist slogans than in communist ones.”

As a result, Putin and many Russians “sincerely believe that those who do not consider the annexation of Crimea just to be mad” and thus requiring treatment. Because they believe that, “Russia [has become] an enormous mad house, the denizens of which sincerely consider those outside its walls to be insane.”

It is no surprise that Putin has begun to institutionalize such feelings in Crimea because “Crimea is not Russia but a territory occupied by it. In Crimea are possible any ‘legal’ experiments,’” as it is “the most genuine polygon of hatred” available to the Kremlin.

Such “experiments” are likely to become policy and spread, and the psychiatric hospitals of Russia are thus likely to be filled again with dissidents. That is something those who support the Crimean Anschluss should think about before they become the real victims of what Putin has done.


Enjoy the article? Then please consider donating today to ensure that Eurasia Review can continue to be able to provide similar content.


Paul Goble

Paul Goble

Paul Goble is a longtime specialist on ethnic and religious questions in Eurasia. Most recently, he was director of research and publications at the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy. Earlier, he served as vice dean for the social sciences and humanities at Audentes University in Tallinn and a senior research associate at the EuroCollege of the University of Tartu in Estonia. He has served in various capacities in the U.S. State Department, the Central Intelligence Agency and the International Broadcasting Bureau as well as at the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Mr. Goble maintains the Window on Eurasia blog and can be contacted directly at [email protected] .

One thought on “Umerov Case Highlights Why Crimean Anschluss A Threat To Russians – OpEd

  • September 12, 2016 at 11:34 am
    Permalink

    Mr. Goble’s latest attempt to vilify the Russians. Doesn’t he know that the US routinely uses psychiatric lockups to silence whoever they cannot tolerate to talk? Especially when crime by the government and its agencies is involved.

    The rest of his article is pure smear campaign based on no verifiable or existing facts. Mr. Goble appears to ignore that one faction of Tatars are affiliated with ISIS and a threat to everybody in Crimea. The other, larger faction of the Tatars actually voted to join Russia, so large was their fear of racial discrimination by the new coup and US produced government in Kiev.

    Mr. Goble should look for a reputable profession instead of acting as a worm. For his information: Crimea at this time is doing well. Turkey and China intend to invest large sums to develop industry and hotels in the peninsula. The French and Italians are negotiating the conditions to grow their wine grapes in Crimea. The people, after two years back in Russia still like their decision and actually live way better than they did live in Ukraine and way better than they would be living in current day Ukraine with its economic collapse.

    Mr. Goble isn’t any specialist of anything. He is a US mole, paid to disseminate disinformation. Shameful that Asian Reviw publishes such dirt.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

CLOSE
CLOSE