Gathering of Polisario troops, near Tifariti (Western Sahara), celebrating the 32nd anniversary ot the Polisario Front.
Gathering of Polisario troops, near Tifariti (Western Sahara), celebrating the 32nd anniversary ot the Polisario Front.


Continuous Hemorrhage Weakens The Polisario – OpEd

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The Polisario isolation at the international level has become even worse. This is due to Barbados’s recent decision to withdraw its recognition of the Sahrawi republic – an entity strongly recommended by the Polisario and supported by Algeria, but which has never been recognized by the UN, neither by any European State or any state from North America.

Today, a few African countries and some others from South America that have recognized this ‘Republic on paper’ within the cold war context, are beginning to reconsider their decision which they judge to be hasty. In the agitation of the 60s and 70s of the last century, Algeria and the toppled Kadhafian regime have tried by all means to weaken Morocco, pro-Western in their eyes.

By welcoming the separatist Polisario Front and provinding it with arms and money, they have vainly tried to impose a republic to the international community. This republic had no real existence and did not fulfill the legal and political conditions required for the existence of a State.

More and more aware that the Western Sahara problem is in fact a regional conflict, a result of the cold war friction, the countries — essentially African and Latin American ones which have recognized the so-called republic — have thus started withdrawing their recognition of an entity which does not exist in reality.

Just during the last decade, more than 30 countries came back on their decision taken at a time of upheavals. This hemorrhage is weakening more the Polisario, and Algeria is being confronted to pressure that is imposed by the international community to act towards a political settlement proposed by Morocco. The plan aims at putting an end to a conflict which has lasted too long and who the main victims are dozens of thousands of persons sequestrated in Tindouf camps, in the Algerian desert, and deprived of their fundamental rights to freedom of movement and expression.

Said Temsamani

Senior Fellow at the Meridian International Center and member of the National Press Club, Washington DC. Said Temsamani is a political analyst who follows events in Morocco and across North Africa.

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