ISSN 2330-717X

24 Years Ago Yeltsin Signed A Peace Treaty With Chechnya That Moscow Didn’t Keep – OpEd

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The August 31, 1996 Khasavyurt accord between Russia and Chechnya which ended the first post-Soviet Russian-Chechen war is better known, but the May 12, 1997 peace treaty signed by the leaders of the two countries, Boris Yeltsin for the Russian Federation and Aslan Maskhadov for the Chechen Republic-Ichkeria, must not be forgotten.

It committed Moscow and Grozny “forever to reject the application of threats and force  for the resolution of disputes and the formation of their relations in correspondence with generally accepted principles of international law” (doshdu.com/24-goda-nazad-mezhdu-rf-i-chechenskoj-respublikoj-byl-podpisan-dogovor-o-druzhbe/).

Like the Khasavyurt accord the year before, the 1997 peace treaty was vitiated by the fact that Moscow did not live up to a single provision in either document and then two years later launched a new war against Chechnya and imposing a colonial administration there which remains in place to this day (kavkaz-uzel.eu/articles/308807/).

Paul Goble

Paul Goble is a longtime specialist on ethnic and religious questions in Eurasia. Most recently, he was director of research and publications at the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy. Earlier, he served as vice dean for the social sciences and humanities at Audentes University in Tallinn and a senior research associate at the EuroCollege of the University of Tartu in Estonia. He has served in various capacities in the U.S. State Department, the Central Intelligence Agency and the International Broadcasting Bureau as well as at the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Mr. Goble maintains the Window on Eurasia blog and can be contacted directly at [email protected] .

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