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US Fed Rate Hike Is The Wrong Move – OpEd

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The Fed’s decision to raise interest rates today is an unfortunate move in the wrong direction. In setting interest rate policy the Fed must decide whether the economy is at risk of having too few or too many jobs, with the latter being determined by the extent to which its current rate of job creation may lead to inflation. It is difficult to see how the evidence would lead the Fed to conclude that the greater risk at the moment is too many jobs.

While at 5.0 percent, the unemployment rate is not extraordinarily high, most other measures of the labor market are near recession levels. The percentage of the workforce that is involuntarily working part-time is near the highs reached following the 2001 recession. The average and median duration of unemployment spells are also near recession highs. And the percentage of workers who feel confident enough to quit their jobs without another job lined up remains near the low points reached in 2002.

If we look at employment rates rather than unemployment, the percentage of prime-age workers (ages 25-54) with jobs is still down by almost three full percentage points from the pre-recession peak and by more than four full percentage points from the peak hit in 2000. This does not look like a strong labor market.

On the other side, there is virtually no basis for concerns about the risk of inflation in the current data. The most recent data show that the core personal consumption expenditure deflator targeted by the Fed increased at just a 1.2 percent annual rate over the last three months, down slightly from the 1.3 percent rate over the last year. This means that the Fed should be concerned about being below its inflation target, not above it.

While wage growth has edged up somewhat in recent months by some measures, it is still well below a rate that is consistent with the Fed’s inflation target. Hourly wages have risen at a 2.7 percent rate over the last year. If there is just 1.5 percent productivity growth, this would be consistent with a rate of inflation of 1.2 percent.

Furthermore, it is important to recognize that workers took a large hit to their wages in the downturn, with a shift of more than four percentage points of national income from wages to profits. In principle, workers can restore their share of national income (the equivalent of an 8 percent wage gain), but the Fed would have to be prepared to allow wage growth to substantially outpace prices for a period of time. If the Fed acts to prevent workers from getting this bargaining power, it will effectively lock in place this upward redistribution. Needless to say, workers at the middle and bottom of the wage distribution can expect to see the biggest hit in this scenario.

One positive point in today’s action is the Fed’s commitment in its statement to allow future rate hikes to be guided by the data, rather than locking in a path towards “normalization” as was effectively done in 2004. If it is the case that the economy is not strong enough to justify rate hikes, then the hike today may be the last one for some period of time. It will be important for the Fed to carefully assess the data as it makes its decision on interest rates at future meetings.

Recent economic data suggest that today’s move was a mistake. Hopefully the Fed will not compound this mistake with more unwarranted rate hikes in the future.

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Dean Baker

Dean Baker is the co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR). He is the author of Plunder and Blunder: The Rise and Fall of the Bubble Economy.

2 thoughts on “US Fed Rate Hike Is The Wrong Move – OpEd

  • December 17, 2015 at 5:36 pm
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    I agree with your points but please pay attention to this fact. You have stated “Hourly wages have risen at a 2.7 percent rate over the last year [and] if there is just 1.5 percent productivity growth, this would be consistent with a rate of inflation of 1.2 percent.” But the Fed has been using this indicator for increasing the federal funds rate. If the former is higher than the latter, as you have indicated correctly, it means higher labor cost per unit of output. This will help workers to receive a higher share of the distributed income and capitalist will receive a lower share of income. The Fed as a protector of capitalists and financiers is not interested in this situation even when there is a high level of income inequality and labor force is suffering. As a reminder Veblen and later Keynes considered the above ratio (wages to productivity) an essential source of inflation in the long run. So, it is correct that the Fed and capitalist government are anti truly full employment: God Bless you Mr. M. Kalecki).

    Reply
  • December 17, 2015 at 5:38 pm
    Permalink

    I agree with your points but you need to keep in mind this fact. have stated “Hourly wages have risen at a 2.7 percent rate over the last year [and] if there is just 1.5 percent productivity growth, this would be consistent with a rate of inflation of 1.2 percent.” But the Fed has been using this indicator for increasing the federal funds rate. If the former is higher than the latter, as you have indicated correctly, it means higher labor cost per unit of output. This will help workers to receive a higher share of the distributed income and capitalist will receive a lower share of income. The Fed as a protector of capitalists and financiers is not interested in this situation even when there is a high level of income inequality and labor force is suffering. As a reminder Veblen and later Keynes considered the above ratio (wages to productivity) an essential source of inflation in the long run. So, it is correct that the Fed and capitalist government are anti truly full employment: God Bless you Mr. M. Kalecki).

    Reply

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