The Three Pillars Of Sustainable Development – OpEd

By Jorge Emilio Sierra Montoya* James Austin, a professor at Harvard University and one of the highest academic authorities in the world of entrepreneurial social responsibility, conducts an in depth study of sustainable development, mostly related to the sustainability which is preferred to be called by many analysts as RSE. As a great academician, he … Continue reading The Three Pillars Of Sustainable Development – OpEd

Fracking In South Africa: An Alternative To Coal? – Analysis

By Vincent Bagilet* In June 2015, the Department of Mineral Resources gazetted regulations related to hydraulic fracturing or fracking in South Africa offering a framework for the exploitation and exploration of shale gas. It could easily lead one to think that another step has been taken in the direction of the highly controversial question of … Continue reading Fracking In South Africa: An Alternative To Coal? – Analysis

Indo-Bhutan Hydro Relations: Between Economic Well Being And Environmental Sustainability – Analysis

One strand of the debate on non-traditional security issues is that future wars will be fought over water. History stands evident of the fact that since the beginning of human civilization man has been settling beside rivers and many of the mighty wars have been fought for water. Water being one of the essential preconditions … Continue reading Indo-Bhutan Hydro Relations: Between Economic Well Being And Environmental Sustainability – Analysis

Former Exxon President On Mission To Clean Up Oil Sands – Analysis

By Jim Stafford Canada has given oil sands a dirty reputation, but a breakthrough, commercially viable technology has caught the eye of a former Exxon Mobil president who is putting it to use to clean up Utah’s billions of barrels of oil sands. Imagine extracting high-quality oil out of the estimated 32 billion barrels buried … Continue reading Former Exxon President On Mission To Clean Up Oil Sands – Analysis

Climate Models Disagree On Strength Of Carbon Land Sink Across Northern Eurasia

In a new assessment of nine state-of-the-art climate model simulations provided by major international modeling centers, Michael Rawlins at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues found broad disagreement in the amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) annually sequestered in tundra and boreal ecosystems of Northern Eurasia, a vast, understudied region of the world. Rawlins … Continue reading Climate Models Disagree On Strength Of Carbon Land Sink Across Northern Eurasia