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The Similarities Between ESG And Fascism Are Scary – OpEd

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Time Magazine was enthrawled with Adolf Hitler in the 30’s, and endorses similar results from Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) divesting objectives.

As Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) divesting in fossil fuels progresses, by many of the masters of the financial universe, the short memories of petrochemicals’ golden goose contributions to societies are leading the world to an era of Extreme Shortages Guaranteed (ESG) like we had in the decarbonized world in the 1800’s!  

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Allowing banks and investment giants like BlackRock, led by CEO Larry Fink to collude to reshape economies and energy infrastructure is a very dangerous precedent. Their movement that promotes the idea of a forcibly monolithic, regimented nation under the control of the investment community is scarily beginning to resemble the fascism that dominated the media in the past.  The American people never voted to give banks this sort of control over our country.

The notion is incomprehensible that unelected and unaccountable functionaries—such as Larry Fink of Blackrock, World Economic Forum executive chairman Klaus Schwab, Federal Reserve Bank Governor Lael Brainard, or SEC Chairman Gary Gensler—can legitimately substitute their progressive beliefs and fixations for the will of the American people that businesses should provide compliance to their ESG guidelines (regardless of the costs), and that the general population should stand aside and accept whatever its betters say is necessary.

Depriving citizens of the more than 6,000 products  that were non-existent before 1900, made from the oil derivatives manufactured from crude oil, is immoral and evil as extreme shortages will result in billions of fatalities from diseases, malnutrition, and weather-related deaths. 

Virtually all the components of wind turbines, solar panels, and all forms of transportation are assembled with products made from oil derivatives manufactured from crude oil. Ridding the world of crude oil would eliminate most forms of transportation and electricity generation from wind and solar.

The domino effects of tinkering with the supply chain of crude oil, is supply shortages and soaring prices for not only electricity, but for the thousands of products that support the entire medical industry, all branches of the military, airports, electronics, communications, merchant ships, container ships, and cruise liners, as well as asphalt for roads, and fertilizers to help feed the world.

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Why is this type of ESG environmental crusade so destructive? Why has it gone from great intentions to utter destruction? They are now the worst form of environmental nihilism morphed into ideological fervor the world has not witnessed since the rise of National Socialism in Germany in the early 1930s. Adolf Hitler appeared on the cover of Time Magazine on multiple occasions, and most famously, on January 2, 1939, when Time Magazine named Adolph Hitler their Man of the Year. The mainstream media endorsed National Socialism, and it is now promoting globally destructive green transition on all seven continents.

Many African, Asian, and South American children with black, brown, and yellow skin are being enslaved and dying in mines and factories to extract and process rare earth and exotic minerals required to support the green movement of the wealthier and healthier countries for solar panels, wind turbines, electric vehicles, and utility-scale storage systems to work. The authors of the Pulitzer Prize nominated book, “Clean Energy ExploitationsHelping Citizens Understand the Environmental and Humanity Abuses That Support Clean Energy,”  call these, BLOOD MINERALS.

If fascism is invisible to us, it is truly the silent killer. It fastens a huge, violent, lumbering state on the free market that drains its capital and productivity like a deadly parasite on a host. The author of the 1939 book “Vampire Economy”, Gunter Reimann, discusses how the fascist state sucks the economic life out of a nation and brings about a slow death of a once-thriving economy.

But most people hear this and dismiss it, probably for good reason. The poor in this country are not poor by any historical standard. They have cell phones, cable TV, cars, lots of food, and plenty of disposable income. What’s more, there is no such thing as a fixed class called the poor. People come and go, depending on age and life circumstances. Plus, in American politics, when you hear kvetching about the poor, everyone knows what you’re supposed to do: hand the government your wallet.

No longer can one generation expect to live a better life than the previous one. The fascist economic model has killed what was once called the American dream. And the truth is, of course, even worse than the statistic reveals. You must consider how many incomes exist within a single household to make up the total income. After World War II, the single-income family became the norm. Then the money was destroyed, and American savings were wiped out and the capital base of the economy was devastated.

It was at this point that households began to struggle to stay above water. The year 1985 was the turning point. This was the year that it became more common than not for a household to have two incomes rather than one. Mothers entered the workforce to keep family income floating.

Today median family income is only slightly above where it was when Nixon wrecked the dollar, put on price and wage controls, created the EPA, and the whole apparatus of the parasitic welfare-warfare state came to be entrenched and made universal.

The problem is more fundamental. It is the quality of the money. It is the very existence of 10,000 regulatory agencies. It is the whole assumption that you must pay the state for the privilege to work. It is the presumption that the government must manage every aspect of the capitalist economic order. In short, it is the total state that is the problem, and the suffering and decline will continue so long as the total state exists.

No aspect of life is untouched by government intervention, and often it takes forms we do not readily see. All of healthcare is regulated, but so is every bit of our food, transportation, clothing, household products, and even private relationships.

Let’s just mention the reality: No government in the history of the world has spent as much, borrowed as much, and created as much fake money as the United States. If the United States doesn’t qualify as a fascist state in this sense, no government ever has.

Fascism has no new ideas, no big projects—and not even its partisans really believe it can accomplish what it sets out to do. The world created by the private sector is so much more useful and beautiful than anything the state has done that the fascists have themselves become demoralized and aware that their agenda has no real intellectual foundation.

The similarities between the effects of Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) divesting objectives and fascism are scary as efforts to cease the use of crude oil could be the greatest threat to civilization, not climate change. Attaining a decarbonized world like the one that existed in the 1800’s, would result in billions of fatalities from disease, malnutrition, and weather-related deaths.

Ronald Stein

Ronald Stein, Founder and Ambassador for Energy & Infrastructure of PTS Advance, headquartered in Irvine, California.

One thought on “The Similarities Between ESG And Fascism Are Scary – OpEd

  • February 21, 2022 at 4:51 am
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    This is an important, critically needed analysis. In the last century fascism centered on what we call the heavy industries of steel, coal production, and manufacturing. In this century information technology has been harnessed to serve the state’s authoritarian needs.

    Our elites don’t understand that they are trying to traverse a vast chasm from a fossil fuel-based economy to a dreamland where fossil fuels play no role. How will they do so? By 1) taxing or denying investment to fossil fuels while 2) forcing investments to intermittent power generation schemes like solar and wind generation, our future.

    I don’t think that planning to cross a chasm in two leaps is wise.

    Reply

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