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Macedonia Erects Tose Proeski Statue

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Late Macedonian pop singer Tose Proeski has found himself in the company of Alexander the Great after his statue was erected in Skopje.

A sculpture of late Macedonian singer Tose Proeski was erected at the Art Bridge on river Vardar in Skopje on Thursday.

The sculpture is part of 29 to be placed at the new bridge, 14 each on both sides and one in the centre.

The central sculpture is dedicated to the Miladinov brothers, whereas the ones at the sides will represent renowned authors, artists, composers, actors etc.

Macedonia
Macedonia

Proeski, who was 26 when he died, was killed when his car collided with a truck in Croatia. His death in October 2007 left Macedonia in a state of near paralysis and shock.

During his short career Proeski recorded five albums and broke all of Macedonia’s popularity records.

According to a recent poll, 81 per cent of the respondents say the Macedonian government should stop splashing out on new monuments as part of its grand revamp of the capital known as Skopje 2014.

Erected mostly in the central area, some of the most notable ones include two nearly 30-metre-high statues set in fountains of Alexander the Great and his father Philip, a 30-metre-high triumphal arch, a massive colonnade with lions and another colonnade with an obelisk in the middle.

The project also envisages the construction of some 20 other buildings, including, museums, theatres, concert halls, hotels and administrative offices whose construction in most cases is either finished or is well under way.

Balkan Insight

Balkan Insight

The Balkan Insight (fornerkt the Balkin Investigative Reporting Network, BIRN) is a close group of editors and trainers that enables journalists in the region to produce in-depth analytical and investigative journalism on complex political, economic and social themes. BIRN emerged from the Balkan programme of the Institute for War & Peace Reporting, IWPR, in 2005. The original IWPR Balkans team was mandated to localise that programme and make it sustainable, in light of changing realities in the region and the maturity of the IWPR intervention. Since then, its work in publishing, media training and public debate activities has become synonymous with quality, reliability and impartiality. A fully-independent and local network, it is now developing as an efficient and self-sustainable regional institution to enhance the capacity for journalism that pushes for public debate on European-oriented political and economic reform.

5 thoughts on “Macedonia Erects Tose Proeski Statue

  • Avatar
    August 11, 2012 at 4:47 am
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    That’s pretty rare for FYROM. A statue to a legitimate figure who identified with the country’s main ethnic group..rather than stealing all their neighbour’s history.

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  • Avatar
    August 11, 2012 at 9:15 am
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    According to a recent poll, 81 per cent of the respondents say the skopjian government should stop splashing out on new monuments as part of its grand revamp of the capital known as Skopje 2014.

    With 81% of the Slavs mocking the huge waste of money while we have nearly 41% unemployement throughout the land is a tragedy. But try telling that to the skopjian leadership who have their heads so far up their behinds they are deaf to the publics outrage.

    So many people have protested over the last 18 months against the skopjian authorities pathetic attempt at fabricating a national identity out of concrete and metal. Many of the Slav residents have called Gruevski a fraud and hypocrite and that his project is as poorly constructed as the distasteful building structures littering the skopjian neighbourhoods like a series of very expensive rubbish piles left out around the town of skopjia.

    Who knows, maybe when we wake up tomorrow we’ll see a statue of our skopjian leader himself (Gruevski) on horseback, and of course, next to his favourite Greek idol Alexander.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    August 11, 2012 at 3:51 pm
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    Wow, all these statues and only two of them belong to Fyrom , Mother Teresa the Albanian Nun and this pop singer Tose Proesk a Bulgarian Slav , both were born in Macedonia.

    I am sure the 30% Macedonian-Albanians don’t mind that only 1 statue represents their ethnic kin.

    Oh, I know why they put Mother Teresa there? Just figured it out. They claimed her as a Slav as well, if you can steal the identity of Alexander the Great whats to stop you from stealing the identity of nun?

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  • Avatar
    August 12, 2012 at 4:57 am
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    @Sam….Tose was not Bulgarian. I had the pleasure of knowing him personally and he would be turning in his grave that people would think of him as anything other than MACEDONIAN! And to all that mock the Skopje 2014 project all I will say is when you go on holiday where do you take photos? In front of the Eiffel tower? The Las Vegas sign? They want to lure tourists and the only way that is done is by having somewhere for them to take photos. Which in turn creates jobs.

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  • Avatar
    August 13, 2012 at 3:02 am
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    Sorry to disappoint you Dan we also knew Tose and he was proud of his Bulgarian heritage. sadly he had to keep it secret in our racist country.

    And as for the statues, maybe the skopjian leadership does need something for the tourists Dan, but please why Greco-Roman structures pickled with Greek and Bulgarian statues. Maybe this reeks of a skopjian leadership desperatley in search of an ID or possibly a history. As for jobs you must be kidding, the skopjian leadership wouldn’t know how to create a job for us even if it came and bit them up the backside.

    Our indigenous people have lived here for thousands of years and as descendents of the Illyrians and Paeonians, we are proud of our heritage. Its time the skopjian authorities done some soul searching and finally admitted their genes and language is a hotch-potch of Albanians, Bulgars, Turks, and possibly Greeks.

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