ISSN 2330-717X

Rajoy Underlines Spain’s Commitment To Challenge Of Climate Change

Spain's Mariano Rajoy. Source: Wikipedia Commons.Spain's Mariano Rajoy. Source: Wikipedia Commons.

During the Climate Change Summit, being held in the French capital, Spain’s Prime Minister Mariano Rajou stressed that “a global, ambitious and legally-binding agreement”, that commits everyone, must come out of Paris. Rajoy also highlighted the major progress that this summit represents: the Kyoto Protocol was signed by 36 countries responsible for 15% of the world’s emissions; while 186 countries are present in Paris, responsible for 96% of global emissions.

At the 21st Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Rajoy, said that this issue is “currently the greatest environmental challenge we are facing”, since it raises “major social and economic challenges”.

In this regard, Spanish Prime Minister added that a new agenda on low growth in emissions must come out of Paris that allows, among other things, for the goal of maintaining global warming below a two-degree increase on pre-industrial levels to be met. According to Rajoy, the summit must offer “a global, ambitious and legally-binding agreement”, that commits all parties according to “their capabilities and circumstances”.

Goals for post-2020

Rajoy stressed that Spain is tackling the Paris Summit “with commitment”, since, as a member of the European Union, it takes on ambitious targets in terms of reducing carbon emissions. In this regard, he recalled some specific actions that have already been implemented: programmes to renew vehicle fleets, measures to increase the energy efficiency of buildings and financing for projects to reduce emissions.

It is a question, added Rajoy, of achieving the goals set for post-2020, that include: Taking on, together with our European partners, the commitment to reduce emissions by at least 40% by 2030 compared with 1990 figures; Mobilising financial resources for developing countries in their fight against climate change. Over the last four years, Spain has allocated 1.4 billion euros to this heading. Recently, the government has agreed to a financial contribution from Spain to the Green Climate Fund of 120 million euros between 2015 and 2020 and; Increasing annual contributions to projects that foster the transition to a low carbon economy in developing countries. The goal is to double this by 2020 and reach a level of 900 million euros per annum.

Rajoy also underlined the major step that the Paris Climate Change Summit represents: the Kyoto Protocol was signed by 36 countries responsible for 15% of the world’s emissions; while 186 countries are present in Paris, between them responsible for 96% of global emissions.

Future Climate Change Act

On another note, Rajoy announced a new Climate Change Act for the next term of office if he continues in power. The new act “will contain Spain’s commitments on the matter of climate change and the de-carbonisation of the economy”, as well as create “a single institutional framework” and tackle the coordinated design of all resources. Among other features, he added, “environmental taxation will be streamlined” and energy efficiency, renewable technologies and R&D+i will be boosted.


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